IME end of May, 2009

They go by different names but their purpose is to deny new claims or close existing ones.

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IME end of May, 2009

Postby Weaselteats » May 10th, 2009, 3:08 pm

I'm scheduled for an IME (insurers medical exam) at the end of May, 2009. I've looked over quite a few posts and am pretty nervous about it. Dr Morris Button in Portland, OR is seeing me for carpal tunnel syndrome. From the looks of his reports from the internet from other IME persons, he is pretty rough.
I've been diagnosed with severe carpal tunnel syndrome through tests such as; bone scan, 16 x-rays, MRI, and nerve tests. If my claim is denied through him, I'm going to find it difficult to figure out how I faked all those tests. Especially the nerve test where they inserted needles (I don't know how long) into muscles in my hand and arm.
I'm not sure why I'm posting this, but I may post again and let everyone know how it went. I guess just to be a part of this community.
All the best.
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IME Exam

Postby Webmaster » May 11th, 2009, 10:10 am

Please read all the IME-related articles linked from the home page and use the search feature to read about the experiences of others. You'll be better prepared doing so. Bring a witness and after the exam write down all you remember about what happened.

In so far as your comment about faking tests, it doesn't matter how much evidence is on your side. The IME's insurers select are not there to give you an impartial exam but one that gives the insurer/employer a reason to deny or close a claim. These reports routinely contradict known medical science and facts. IMEs with a public position that carpal tunnel doesn't exist are many times used to perform these exams so an impartial exam is not even possible. Carpal tunnel is one of the worst injuries percentage wise to get accepted.

You should start interviewing lawyers since it's almost guaranteed your claim will be closed. Having a lawyer will make the insurer think twice about closing/denying the claim. There's info about choosing a lawyer from the home page too.

The only good news I can give you is that Dr. Morris Button is not on our list of the worst IME's. IWA's IME legislation helped limit the use of and in some cases eliminated altogether the worst IME offenders.

If you can't find someone to go to the exam with you contact us at iwa[at]injuredworker.org and one of us will accompany you.

Sorry for the bad news. Good luck!
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Independent Medical Examinations

Postby johnrocks » May 14th, 2009, 9:32 pm

Many disability and workers compensation insurance payers have used independent medical examinations (IMEs) for years to make payment determinations about disability and workers compensation claims.

johnrocks
attorney directory
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Postby Weaselteats » June 8th, 2009, 4:12 pm

I had my IME done, and to my suprise it wasn't as bad as I had made it out in my mind to be. The doctor who performed my IME was suprisingly kind. I know a lot of people who have had a bad experience with IME's and I just wanted to say that mine was fine. The IME doctor agreed with my diagnosis from my primary care physicians, to my suprise.

I'm assuming that all the tests that I had done to see if I had any other diagnosis other than carpal tunnel syndrome helped in securing my IME diagnosis.

I'd offer a bit of advice that seemed to help me. If your primary care physician wants you to have a test done, do it. I had so many blood tests, an MRI, over 20 x-rays, nerve testing, and a bone scan just to see exactly what was contributing to my "illness." I think this secured my initial diagnosis of carpal tunnel syndrome so as to leave out any doubt as to the cause.

Unfortunately there are plenty of bad insurer medical exams. Just wanted to put in my $.02 and offer some hope that they aren't all bad.
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Postby yourbestfriend » August 21st, 2009, 8:34 pm

Weaselteats wrote:I had my IME done, and to my suprise it wasn't as bad as I had made it out in my mind to be. The doctor who performed my IME was suprisingly kind. I know a lot of people who have had a bad experience with IME's and I just wanted to say that mine was fine. The IME doctor agreed with my diagnosis from my primary care physicians, to my suprise.

I'm assuming that all the tests that I had done to see if I had any other diagnosis other than carpal tunnel syndrome helped in securing my IME diagnosis.

I'd offer a bit of advice that seemed to help me. If your primary care physician wants you to have a test done, do it. I had so many blood tests, an MRI, over 20 x-rays, nerve testing, and a bone scan just to see exactly what was contributing to my "illness." I think this secured my initial diagnosis of carpal tunnel syndrome so as to leave out any doubt as to the cause.

Unfortunately there are plenty of bad insurer medical exams. Just wanted to put in my $.02 and offer some hope that they aren't all bad.


IME doctors are asked to make difficult determinations and more often than not claims are accepted based upon their opinions. Attending physicians often won't answer or don't understand Oregon law in regard to workers' compensation insurance. Others simply see insurers as deep pockets and refuse to offer an honest opinion regarding the causation. A Kaiser Permanente study several years ago revealed that 50% of their physicians lied to obtain benefits for their patients. It is no wonder that insurers turn to IME doctors to determine whether a claim should be accepted.
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Postby mrxtramean » September 7th, 2009, 6:25 pm

20 x-rays to say carpal tunnel!! Some doctors are soaking the system. This is why we need health care reform and get away from insurance companies all together.

There's got to be a better way.

When a doctor has to charge $900 for a $80 item just to get medicare, this hurts the system. When a doctor repeats the same test, or here, x-rays over and over again, they get to charge the insurance company and get paid 20 times!! And if it's workers comp., it's your employer that get's the short end of the shaft in the long run.
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